You are currently browsing all posts tagged with 'anime'.
Displaying 11 - 20 of 26 entries.

J – Jigoku Shojo (Hell Girl)

  • Posted on April 12, 2017 at 4:54 pm

Jigoku Shoujo, or Hell Girl, as it is translated is another great horror anime. This particular series is about a young girl who people say you can call on to drag your enemy to hell. But the price is your soul. I loved the dark themes of this particular anime, and the piecemeal storytelling makes for a wonderful watch.

Why I reccomend it for writers: Specifically because of how the story is told. We rarely hear more than stock phrases from the main character, but through her interactions with the world around her, we slowly learn more about her. It’s a lesson in showing, not telling.

Warnings: creepy things, death, murder

For the rest of the articles in this series, please visit this page.

Have you seen this anime? What about it made you want to be a better writer? Do you intend to go shotgun this anime now that I’ve shown it to you? Comment below and tell me what you think!

I – Ibara no Ou (King of Thorns)

  • Posted on April 11, 2017 at 1:00 pm

The japanese word for thorns is Ibara, and in this case, thorns are a deadly enemy. A story about how humanity deals with a mysterious disease turns into a horrific survival horror, and I was rivetted the entire time. A movie, instead of a series, I personally think this narrative is one of the twisty-turniest I’ve ever seen or read.

Why I recommend it to writers: if you want to write any kind of suspense or horror, Ibara no Ou is a great resource for both. It shows a mastery of psychology that I greatly enjoy.

Warnings: Death, Dismemberment, tons of imagery that might be displeasing.

For the rest of the articles in this series, please visit this page.

Have you seen this anime? What about it made you want to be a better writer? Do you intend to go shotgun this anime now that I’ve shown it to you? Comment below and tell me what you think!

H – Horo Musuko (Wandering Son)

  • Posted on April 10, 2017 at 1:35 pm

If you have trouble writing a diverse cast, or relating to transgender characters then Horo Musuko is for you. This story is the adorable, calming tale of a young girl’s transition from DMAB (Defined Male at Birth) to her true self.

Why I recommend it for writers: The slice-of-life genre can be very healing, and every writer I know is extremely stressed. Not only that, but it will help with diversity in your writing to see a different perspective.

Warning: This is just one experience with the transgender condition. Please do not assume all transgender individuals have the same process. Also, lots of misgendering of main characters. Lots of it.

For the rest of the articles in this series, please visit this page.

Have you seen this anime? What about it made you want to be a better writer? Do you intend to go shotgun this anime now that I’ve shown it to you? Comment below and tell me what you think!

E – Ergo Proxy

  • Posted on April 6, 2017 at 1:29 pm

In the fifth day of our twenty-six-day journey, I come to a great classic of the anime world, Ergo Proxy. A dazzling Science Fiction tale, Ergo Proxy digs deep into psychology, film noir, and mindscrews. One of the best parts of this series is that it follows two protagonists, Re-L and Vincent Law. Between the two of them, we explore the rich world and slowly put together the dark, deep well of that world. 

Why I recommend it for writers: The solid narrative, as well as the absolutely masterful use of unreliable narrators just tickles me.

Warnings: Murders. Lots of murders.

For the rest of the articles in this series, please visit this page.

Have you seen this anime? What about it made you want to be a better writer? Do you intend to go shotgun this anime now that I’ve shown it to you? Comment below and tell me what you think!

 

D – Death Parade

  • Posted on April 5, 2017 at 5:50 pm

The illustrious D in our list is not Vampire Hunter D, as one might think, but a newer series called Death Parade!

There’s just something about this loving romp through games and challenges to face the trials of life and death.

Why I recommend it for Writers: The final reveal. Honestly, I didn’t see it coming, and the fact that there was foreshadowing before hand made my day. Please, watch this show and apply techniques from it to your own stories. My favorite story was the married couple from the first episode. The bowling episode is adorable too.

Warnings: Death, Gore, maiming.

For the rest of the articles in this series, please visit this page.

Have you seen this anime? What about it made you want to be a better writer? Do you intend to go shotgun this anime now that I’ve shown it to you? Comment below and tell me what you think!

B – Berserk

  • Posted on April 3, 2017 at 5:19 pm

The next letter on our list is B, which in this case stands for Berserk. A dark fantasy series, this series focuses on main character Guts, and his bloody path to salvation and vengeance. I would recommend the old version, rather than the new remake, if only for the quality of animation.

Why Writers should watch it: Between the badass villain and the main character, this show is a wonderful combination of characterisation and dark gore. The reason I recommend it to writers, however, is because, in the flashback arc, there is a lovely fall-to-darkness by a main character that the best writers should attempt to emulate.

Warnings: nudity, rape, gore, torture.

For the rest of the articles in this series, please visit this page.

Click the picture to go to the TVTropes page.

Have you seen this anime? What about it made you want to be a better writer? Do you intend to go shotgun this anime now that I’ve shown it to you? Comment below and tell me what you think!

A – Abenobashi mahou Shoutengai

  • Posted on April 1, 2017 at 11:05 am

To start off the A to Z blogging challenge, we’ll be reviewing 26 anime that I think every writer should  watch to better their own craft.

 Abenobashi Mahou Shoutengai (or Magical Shopping Arcade Abenobashi, for those of us who speak English.) is a comedic romp through alternate universes, starring a young boy and girl. The story begins in summer, and the entirety of it is a character exploration of the main character.

 Why Writers should watch this show:  The sheer amount of plot that goes into this story is amazing. Watch it multiple times, and each time you’ll see some new bit of foreshadowing, some new plot point that you didn’t know in the first viewing.

Warnings:  Fanservice, Multiple universes, String theory, Preteen crushes, and adorable hijinks.

The rest of the articles in this series will be posted on this page. Sign up for email subscription so that you dont miss out on the next awesome anime!

Have you seen this anime? What about it made you want to be a better writer? Do you intend to go shotgun this anime now that I’ve shown it to you? Comment below and tell me what you think!

 

 

Email address

A to Z Challenge Theme Reveal!

  • Posted on March 20, 2017 at 7:01 am

This year, I’ll be participating in the A-To-Z-Challenge. Which, if you don’t know, is a huge blog-hop where everyone participating posts daily during the month of April. These posts have to be titled from A to Z, and go along with a theme chosen before the month begins! Normally, people choose themes that work well for them, as it’s a very tough thing to maintain a post a day.

I’ve decided to do small posts of only about a hundred words each, in order to make sure that my writing stamina remains pure for my lovely books. But that doesn’t mean my reveal isn’t worthwhile, oh no! If you are a writer yourself, or maybe just a nerd/geek/dork, you’ll jump for joy at the theme I’ve chosen!

 

Official Image – Not Mine

ANIME!

That is to say, I’ll be reviewing animes that all writers should watch. I’ll give a short blurb about what the anime is about, and then about why I’m recommending it to writers specifically. After that, I’ll be providing a short list of warnings, if necessary, for the anime itself. This way you can avoid unpleasantness if you don’t want to see it.

I’ve had a love of anime and manga ever since I was introduced at the tender age of nine to Sailor Moon, Digimon, and Pokemon. After that, the love affair continued with Cowboy Bebop and Outlaw Star, both of which are great space operas. You should try them out! (No they aren’t on my list! You’ll have to wait and see what anime made the Alphabet!)

The anime I’ve watched and the manga I’ve read have really shaped who I am as a person and what I write. So I want to share this list with everyone so that anime can continue to improve the world! Join me, and we’ll learn together!

Have you ever watched an anime and thought to yourself ‘this is a great story! How did they do it?’ Are you new to the anime scene? Do you have a favorite anime you think should be on the list?  Comment below and let us know!

Email address

Writing Anime: An Interview

  • Posted on August 21, 2016 at 11:35 pm

Today, instead of lecturing you on what to cherry-pick from certain animes, I’ve met with and interviewed an individual who knows his stuff. Cuchallain has a long career of analysing and reviewing anime, manga and video games. So much so in fact that I greatly respect his opinions on most of the review videos I’ve watched. He also happens to have my favorite Let’s Play of Tales of Zestiria on the entirety of the internet, so let’s put that out there too.

As the first interview I ever conducted, Cu and I started with just a few questions, and while he didn’t exactly consider himself an expert to start with, it quickly became apparent to me that he was, in fact, quite knowledgeable. An avid anime fan since the age of ten years old, a convention-goer on the regular, and now the personality behind a youtube channel with over five thousand subscribers, Cu is also incredibly humble.

When asked what goes into his writing for his typical reviews, he explained that he’s actually very unscripted with them. At most, he takes a few notes, generally about the speech of the characters and the themes behind the videos. He in fact, doesn’t even script his theory videos. Then, unfortunately, we devolved into a discussion about his online name, and then that devolved into a conversation on fanfiction and the wonders of Inuyasha as a gateway drug.

Writing Anime: Pokemon Go

  • Posted on July 23, 2016 at 5:13 pm

So, like most others, my life has been taken over by Pokemon Go, an altered reality game where you catch cute as hell pokemon and run around like a crazy person. Altered Reality Games are defined as ” an interactive networked narrative that uses the real world as a platform and uses transmedia storytelling to deliver a story that may be altered by players’ ideas or actions.” What this means is, it’s interactive and fully user-based. In this case, it involves walking and jogging around town to different landmarks, collecting items from those landmarks, and catching cute pokemon that spawn through out town.

Now, what does this have to do with Writing? Well, it explains a lot about fandom and how interacting with it works. We’ve seen a lot of examples of fandom interactions between those of us who create, and those who consume. Often times, those that interact with their fans generally make more sales, and also have more material with which to work. After all, what better engine of creation than several hundred rabid fans all coming up with theories like breathing?

In fact, some artists interact with their fandoms solely for this reason. Others, however, have fun with it, and generally just interact with their fans for entertainment. Then there are those who fuck it up royally while interacting, and somehow get accused of being predatory towards their fanbase (here’s looking at you, John Greene).

One of my favorite examples of an author who interacts with their fanbase is Andrew Hussie, creator of modern day Illiad Homestuck and Problem Sleuth. This is a man whose work has garnered him a fanbase capable of pulling together 1.2 million dollars in TWO. WEEKS. I saw the kickstarter (and donated to it myself) go from 0 dollars to $500,000 in 24 hours, all in anticipation of a videogame.

How did he do it? In-jokes. Good writing. MASSIVE character base. He opened his twitter and several other places for questions to his fanbase. He allowed them to interact with him, and they did. It was massive. In fact, there’s an entire in-joke within the fandom (Fat Vriska, for anyone who knows it) that was started when someone on Formspring asked him about the weight of one of his characters. Eventually, he was asked about Vriska. Which concluded in this glorious manner:

In one of the most glorious fuck-you’s I’ve ever seen, he declared this, and the fandom ran with it.

For more of these absolutely hilarious happenings, you can, of course go to Knowyourmeme.com, and read up on all of them. Or, you can attempt to track them all down. That could be a fun scavenger hunt!

Speaking of scavenger hunts, have you heard of CipherHunt? Well, the fandom of Gravity Falls has. You see, Gravity Falls is a disney show that made it’s fandom massive through the use of ciphers, mysteries and the sorts of things that make those particular fans go crazy. That is, an omniscient Dorito demon who makes bad deals. CipherHunt is creator Alex Hirsch‘s way of making his fans happy one last time. Even though the series has ended, he’s provided them a series of clues, and told them, go on, get hunting.

At the end of each clue is a souvenir/next clue. Now, this isn’t possible for ALL authors, obviously, especially if you don’t have DISNEY backing you. But the fact that he allows it, even though his series is over, shows you what kind of person ends up with a fandom that large. Playful people who love what they’re doing.

Rebecca Sugar, creator of Steven Universe, is another playful person who loves what she’s doing, and in so doing, interacts with her fandom. But she does it quite a bit less than the others on this list. Honestly, she just keeps an eye on what her fandom creates and says, and then sometimes makes nods to it in her show. This is the bare minimum, but because of the way her show works, it does wonders.

So, you might be asking, how can I become this sort of creator? What do I need to do to woo my fandom beast? Well, first of all, find the fans. If you have work out already, look at who bought it, and who likes it. Encourage these people to talk to you. Encourage them to create, whether fanfiction, fanart, or fanmusic. Encourage creation, and it’ll create itself around you.

Then, remember, no matter what you do, it’s not going to be perfect. Laugh about your mistakes with those who point them out. Or, like Hussie does, make them into injokes. Have a sense of humour, and openly enjoy the community growing around your works. Even if it’s only a few people.

And finally, be accessible. Don’t hide yourself away, because while that may work for people like Steven King, or George R.R. Martin, when you’re writing for the sort of demographic that likes Anime and Manga, you really can’t afford to.

Who knows, if you succeed, you just might end up like Ishida-sensei, the creator of Tokyo Ghoul, who got to share his joy at his new Pokemon with the fans of his work.

 

Follow

Follow this blog

Get every new post delivered right to your inbox.

Email address

%d bloggers like this: